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 Annular Solar Eclipse of 2020 June 21
 from Oman, India or Tibet (China)

To observe the 2020 June 21 annular eclipse, I will likely travel to Oman because it’s the perfect choice both for the weather and the beauty of the country or else to the Tibetan plateau where the elevation will provide more enjoyable temperatures. Trying to view a deeper and nearly pearled annular, and yet not even close to ASE 1966 in Greece, from the summit of the Hardeol peak (Temple of God) at 7,151 meters (23,461 feet) in India is enticing although the odds of succeeding are far too low because of the extremely high elevation, technical climb challenges, remoteness and pre-monsoon potentially unstable weather; moreover to this date this peak has only been climbed twice. In the end Tibet could be the more balanced option enabling the eclipse chasers to avoid torrid heat and airborne dust.
The visual appearance, through solar filters unless near sunrise or sunset, of this deep annular solar eclipse will be similar to the February 1999 annular.

You can use this solar eclipse calculator to compute the local circumstances of the eclipse, and the solar eclipse timer notifies the beginning of the various events. A time exposure calculator is there to help you choose your camera settings.


Click on thumbnails for a larger version

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Annular Solar Eclipse 2020
Eclipse circumstances


Annular Solar Eclipse 2020 June Average Cloud Cover
Average cloudiness in June along the path of annularity
(courtesy of Jay Anderson)

Annular Solar Eclipse 2020 Animation
Annular eclipse animation


Oman Rub al-Khali Sand Dune
Rub al-Khali sand dunes in Oman

Hardeol Peak India
Hardeol peak in India (approach from Munsiyari and view from the Milam Glacier)


Baily’s beads simulation from the Hardeol Peak summit in India (generated by my Solar Eclipse Maestro application)

After carefully studying the chances to succeed in viewing this eclipse from the summit of the Hardeol peak or other peaks around I decided to bail out on it as it wouldn’t have brought much other than taking high risks and could not qualify this annular as a broken or pearled one even at this elevation anyway.
That said an observation from the Tibetan plateau does help minimize the risks while at the same time keeping some of the advantages. It’s also an opportunity to visit the site of the Ngari (Shiquanhe) observatory under construction.

Annular Solar Eclipse 2020 June Fractional Cloud Amount
Fractional cloud amount in June along the eclipse path around time of annularity
(courtesy of Jay Anderson)

Annular Solar Eclipse June 2020 June Average Cloud Cover Oman Arabic Peninsula
Average cloudiness in June over Africa and the Arabic Peninsula
(courtesy of Jay Anderson)

Annular Solar Eclipse June 2020 June Average Cloud Cover Pakistan India Tibet
Average cloudiness in June over Pakistan, India and Tibet
(courtesy of Jay Anderson)

The following pictures were taken in February 1999 and you can see they match the simulations quite well although those were done at low resolution. Observers who wanted to have both a complete ring and a nice display of Baily’s beads had to be well inside the path by about 8 kilometers, the village of Greenough being indeed barely qualified: some of them decided to go a few kilometers to the south to be on the safer side. Similar pictures can again be taken during this annular eclipse.
Beads and chromosphere can be seen on all the pictures that were taken without any solar filter. Note: not using any proper solar filter is not recommended unless you know exactly what you’s doing. If you are not experienced then please DO NOT ATTEMPT this and DO NOT LOOK THROUGH THE VIEWFINDER.

Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Fred Espenak Greenough Western Australia
Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Fred Espenak Greenough Western Australia
Picture taken without solar filter, about 13 seconds before second contact, by Fred Espenak from Greenough in Western Australia

Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Fred Espenak Greenough Western Australia
Picture taken without solar filter, about 12 seconds after third contact, by Fred Espenak from Greenough in Western Australia

Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Fred Espenak Greenough Western Australia
Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Fred Espenak Greenough Western Australia
Picture taken without solar filter, about 9 seconds before second contact, by Fred Espenak from Greenough in Western Australia

Annular Solar Eclipse February 1999 Daniel Fischer Greenough South Western Australia
Picture taken without solar filter, about 11 seconds after third contact, by Daniel Fischer from Greenough South in Western Australia

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Last page update on February 26, 2016.
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