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Google Maps Logo Interactive Google Maps
Logo Google Earth Google Earth Files (kmz)

The interactive maps show the solar eclipses paths across Earth’s surface. The umbral or antumbral northern and southern limits of a solar eclipse are plotted in pink while the central line is blue. The four-way toggle arrows (upper left corner) are used for navigating around the map. The zoom bar (left edge) is used to change the magnification or map scale. The three buttons (top right) turn on either a map view, a satellite view or a hybrid map/satellite view. You can append a query string to each map web page URL in order to alter the default display. The parameters can be specified in any order or can be omitted. It should look something like :
 ?Lat=24.4958333&Lng=17.9600000&Zoom=11&Map=G_HYBRID_MAP&LC=1 (example)

  • Latitude is a number in decimal notation and is positive in the Northern hemisphere,
  • Lng for Longitude is a number in decimal notation and is positive if East of Greenwich,
  • Zoom is a number between 0 and 17 specifying the zoom level (17 is highest),
  • Map is a constant specifying the map type (G_NORMAL_MAP, G_SATELLITE_MAP, G_HYBRID_MAP or G_PHYSICAL_MAP),
  • LC is a boolean value 0 or 1 telling if the local circumstances bubble should automatically be displayed at the specified coordinates (0 or 1).

Clicking anywhere in the map will show the local circumstances of the eclipse at the location of the click. A "Google Map" help is available too.
The Google Earth (available for MacOS X, Windows and Linux) files, will draw the solar eclipses paths across Earth’s surface. The umbral or antumbral northern and southern limits of a solar eclipse are plotted in pink while the central line is blue. The penumbra outer limits and the curves of maximum on the horizon and sunrise or sunset are plotted respectively in green and orange.
The "dynamic local circumstances predictions at the click’s location", a feature available with my interactive Google maps, can’t be implemented as is because the Google Earth client application provides no means of getting the current pointer position. However, by clicking on the framed cross-hair cursor Google Earth Framed Cross-hair Eclipse Cursor always located at the center of the view, you will obtain the local circumstances at that location (have a look at this sample).
The Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses Database will give you access to every eclipses over the -1999 to +3000 period.


Grazing Zones

Those maps are pretty heavy and don’t load well in most browsers. Please use only Firefox 2+, Internet Explorer 6+ or Safari 3.2+ to display them.

Total Solar Eclipse 2008

The maps and files use data from Fred Espenak’s NASA TP 2007-214149 Rev1 October 2007 revised bulletin.
Total solar eclipse of Friday, August 1st, 2008 (≈600 KB) includes the north and south grazing zones
Total solar eclipse of Friday, August 1st, 2008 (≈400 KB) includes the north grazing zone
Total solar eclipse of Friday, August 1st, 2008 (≈400 KB) includes the south grazing zone

Same data but in Google Earth. Using Google Earth is generally faster.
Total solar eclipse of Friday, August 1st, 2008 (172 KB) includes both grazing zones


Annular Solar Eclipse 2009

The maps and files use data from Fred Espenak’s NASA TP 2008-214169 March 2008 bulletin.

Please ask me for the maps if you’re interested.


Total Solar Eclipse 2009

The maps and files use data from Fred Espenak’s NASA TP 2008-214169 March 2008 bulletin.

Please ask me for the maps if you’re interested.


Annular Solar Eclipse 2010

The maps and files use data from Fred Espenak’s NASA TP 2008-214171 December 2008 bulletin.
Annular solar eclipse of Friday, January 15th, 2010 (≈300 KB) includes the north and south grazing zones
Annular solar eclipse of Friday, January 15th, 2010 (≈200 KB) includes the north grazing zone
Annular solar eclipse of Friday, January 15th, 2010 (≈200 KB) includes the south grazing zone

Same data but in Google Earth. Using Google Earth is generally faster.
Annular solar eclipse of Friday, January 15th, 2010 (180 KB) includes both grazing zones


Total Solar Eclipse 2010

The maps and files use data from Fred Espenak’s NASA TP 2008-214171 December 2008 bulletin.

Please ask me for the maps if you’re interested.

 


Last page update on May 3, 2009.
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